It’s not uncommon for children to have their tonsils removed. However, new research has shown that it could make them more vulnerable to a host of infections, as well as making them more likely to suffer from colds and respiratory illnesses. The removal of tonsils was also found that increase the risks of developing allergic conditions, skin problems and eye diseases.

The tissues found in the tonsils play an important role in the development of a child’s immune system. They detect and block bacteria and viruses into the throat and lungs. They are usually removed when they are causing repeated cases of tonsillitis or when they are obstructing the patients airways. But, according to the researchers, there should be more alternatives to surgery due to the higher risks.

The removal of the adenoids was also found to double the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and emphysema. As well as this, there was a 78% higher reported incidence of skin diseases and infections. The authors noted that it was “not surprising” that removing key parts of the body’s natural immune system would have an impact on its ability to fight infections.

According to lead author of the study, Dr Sean Byers from the University of Melbourne: “Our results show increased risks for long-term diseases after surgery, support delaying tonsil and adenoid removal if possible, which could aid normal immune system development in childhood and reduce these possible later-life disease risks. As we uncover more about the function of immune tissues and the lifelong consequences of their removal, especially during sensitive ages when the body is developing.”

He added: “Our results show increased risks for long-term diseases after surgery, support delaying tonsil and adenoid removal if possible, which could aid normal immune system development in childhood and reduce these possible later-life disease risks. As we uncover more about the function of immune tissues and the lifelong consequences of their removal, especially during sensitive ages when the body is developing.”

Tim Mitchell, a consultant otolaryngologist and council member of the Royal College of Surgeons, said the results of the study “warrant further investigation”. He said: “Before opting to remove tonsils or adenoids, surgeons will always consider and discuss all treatment options, including non-surgical treatments, with patients, and parents in the case of children. There has been a significant decrease in the number of tonsillectomies and adenoidectomies performed in the last few decades.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *